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wilson's phalarope migration

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Wilson's Phalaropes are unusually halophilic (salt-loving) and feed in great numbers when on migration on saline lakes such as Mono Lake in California and the Great Salt Lake of Utah, often with Red-necked Phalaropes. We did not observe their trademark feeding technique of swimming in a tight circle  to form a vortex from which to pluck invertebrate prey, though. Once the females lay their eggs, they begin their southward migration, leaving the males to incubate the eggs. Of the three Phalarope species, only the Wilson’s nests in Texas. During breeding season, the female has a dark gray back and brown and black wings. Two of the species, Red Phalarope and Red-necked Phalarope, nest on high Arctic tundra and winter out at sea. Females more boldly patterned than males. It is found in inland habitats in contrast to the high Arctic breeding grounds and pelagic winter ranges, of the other two species (Colwell and Jehl 1994, Rubega et al. Last spring we had the luck to spot a few individuals paddling around on one of the ponds at Lafitte’s Cove, Galveston Island. The phalaropes breed in marshy habitat adjacent to open water from the central United States (including Mono Lake!) When feeding, a Wilson's Phalarope will often swim in … Although very common, this bird's population may have declined in some areas due to the loss of prairie wetland habitat. They are highly gregarious and social throughout the year, gathering in large flocks during migration and while overwintering. Wilson's Phalarope: This medium-sized sandpiper has gray-brown upperparts, red-brown streaks on back and shoulders, red-brown markings on white underparts, gray crown, white face, black eye-line, a black needle-like bill, gray wings and a white tail and rump. Wilson’s phalaropes flock to the salty lakes of western America in the late summer. When feeding, a Wilson's phalarope will often swim in a small, rapid circle, forming a small whirlpool. Natural light. A strikingly patterned shorebird with a needle-like bill, pearl-gray head and back, white underparts, black stripe through eye and down neck, and chestnut markings on breast and back. Birds like the Wilson’s Phalarope depend on Mono Lake, as well as Great Salt Lake and a host of other lakes in South America, for their survival. Mono Lake is twinned with Great Salt Lake in Utah and Mar Chiquita in Argentina because of their combined role in providing critical habitat for Wilson’s Phalaropes. A few staging areas are of critical importance during migration. Canon EOS 7D/500mm f/4L IS (+1.4x TC). 2002). The young feed themselves. It has a long, pointed black bill and long black legs. north into central Canada. Phalaropus tricolor. The average longevity in the wild is 10 years.[9]. This spinning motion, or more accurately the image of many phalaropes spinning together, served as the inspiration for Sanctuary’s main musical theme. This bird is named after Scottish-American ornithologist Alexander Wilson. Phalarope de Wilson: Galician: Falaropo de Wilson: German: ... Each … Female Wilson’s Phalarope at Lafitte’s Cove, Galveston Island, Texas. Briefly common in spring migration (late April to mid-May) in the Southwest. Three to four eggs are laid in a ground nest near water. Every year in late summer, migrating Wilson's Phalaropes put on an amazing show as enormous flocks amass on salty lakes of the West. ... Wilson’s Phalarope. Wilson's Phalaropes are unusually halophilic (salt-loving) and feed in great numbers when on migration on saline lakes such as Mono Lake in California and the Great Salt Lake of Utah, often with Red-necked Phalaropes. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of text or images without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Coots and phalaropes both have lobed toes. 9" (23 cm). Wilson's Phalarope - Phalaropus tricolor - Species Information and Photos, including id keys, habitat, diet, behavior, nesting, migration, and conservation status They also nest less than 5 m (16.4 ft.) apart during the breeding season. Wilson's phalaropes are unusually halophilic (salt-loving) and feed in great numbers when on migration on saline lakes such as Mono Lake in California, Lake Abert in Oregon, and the Great Salt Lake of Utah, often with red-necked phalaropes. It nests on the shore in vegetation. Links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given with appropriate and specific direction to the original content at twoshutterbirds.com. Confirmed nesting reports (nests with eggs or downy young) were reported from Jackson County in the southwest, east to McLeod and Hennepin Counties, and north to Polk and Marshall Counties. "500,000 birds to migrate from Utah to Argentina", "Nuevos registros para la avifauna de El Salvador", "Wilson's Phalarope Identification, All About Birds, Cornell Lab of Ornithology", "Breeding Biology of Wilson's Phalarope in Southcentral Saskatchewan", https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Wilson%27s_phalarope&oldid=992177434, Native birds of the Northwestern United States, Taxonbars with automatically added original combinations, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License. They feed by spinning circles in the rich brine, stirring whirlpools of brine flies and other nutrients. In breeding plumage, both sexes have dark lines extending from their eyes down the neck. Wilson's Phalarope was first described in 1819 by Louis Jean Pierre Vieillot (1748-1831), a French ornithologist who fled Haiti for the United States during the French Revolution and began studying the birds here; 26 of the genera established by him are still in use. Ontdek de perfecte stockfoto's over Wilsons Phalarope en redactionele nieuwsbeelden van Getty Images Kies uit premium Wilsons Phalarope van de hoogste kwaliteit. Phalaropes are the only shorebirds that regularly swim in deep water. It’s the most distinctive member of a unique group. Although Wilson's Phalarope historically has been considered accidental in the Caribbean, the increasing number of observations there during the 1980s would seem to indicate a change in their migration route. Wilson’s Phalarope is the only solely New World resident among the 3 phalarope species. Males are duller with pale gray upperparts, orangey neck, and white throat. Wilson's phalaropes overwinter in salt marshes and wetlands in Bolivia and Argentina. Family: Scolopacidae. The Wilson’s Phalarope is one of Minnesota’s most striking shorebirds. The specific tricolor is from Latin tri-, "three-", and color, coloris "colour".[5][6]. Download this stock image: Wilson's Phalarope - female on migration in Spring Phalaropus tricolor Gulf Coast of Texas, USA BI027385 - F11D3X from Alamy's library of millions of high resolution stock photos, illustrations and vectors. The females pursue males, compete for nesting territory, and will aggressively defend their nests and chosen mates. Feeds on crane flies and brine shrimp. There they spin round and round in the nutrient-rich waters, creating whirlpools that stir up invertebrates that will fuel their migration to South America. Feeds on crane flies and brine shrimp. Wilson's phalaropes are unusually halophilic (salt-loving) and feed in great numbers when on migration on saline lakes such as Mono Lake in California, Lake Abert in Oregon, and the Great Salt Lake of Utah, often with red-necked phalaropes. Wilson's phalarope (Phalaropus tricolor) is a small wader. The breeding female is predominantly gray and brown above, with white underparts, a reddish neck and reddish flank patches. Migration: Lakeshores, mudflats, marshes. In breeding plumage the female Wilson's Phalarope is the most colorful of the sexes. Birds then continue migration south through Central America, July-October. This bird, the largest of the phalaropes, breeds in the prairies of North America in western Canada and the western United States. The preferred breeding habitat for In winter, the plumage is essentially grey above and white below, but the dark eyepatch is always present. Note female's apparent reluctance to interact with two males. Wilson’s Phalarope is a shorebird sometimes seen at the Edmonds marsh in spring migration.

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